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If you diet continuously for a month, these shocking effects will be seen on your health

Dieting, a common practice among individuals striving to achieve their health and fitness goals, involves conscious control and restriction of food intake. While short-term dieting can lead to weight loss and improved health markers, continuous or prolonged dieting may have significant effects on both physical and mental well-being. In this comprehensive exploration, we delve into the shocking effects that may manifest on your health when you embark on a month-long diet journey.

1. Metabolic Slowdown

Metabolism, the process by which your body converts food into energy, plays a crucial role in maintaining bodily functions and regulating weight. Continuous calorie restriction, a hallmark of many diets, can lead to metabolic slowdown, where your body adjusts to conserve energy in response to decreased calorie intake.

1.1. Reduced Metabolic Rate

When you consistently consume fewer calories than your body requires for daily activities, it adapts by lowering its metabolic rate. This reduction in metabolic rate makes it more challenging to continue losing weight and may even lead to weight regain once normal eating patterns resume.

1.2. Hormonal Changes

Dieting for an extended period can disrupt hormone levels, particularly leptin and ghrelin. Leptin, known as the “satiety hormone,” signals fullness to the brain, while ghrelin, the “hunger hormone,” stimulates appetite. Prolonged calorie restriction can lower leptin levels and increase ghrelin levels, leading to heightened hunger sensations and further slowing down metabolism.

2. Muscle Loss

Muscle mass is metabolically active tissue that plays a vital role in maintaining metabolic rate and supporting overall physical function. However, extended periods of dieting without adequate protein intake and resistance training can result in the breakdown of muscle tissue for energy, leading to muscle loss.

2.1. Loss of Lean Muscle Mass

When your body is in a prolonged calorie deficit, it may prioritize breaking down muscle tissue for energy

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Activities Planned to Help Protect America’s Mental Health

America’s mental health has reached a crisis, and with the beginning of Mental Health Awareness Month, efforts to raise the conscience of Americans are taking place nationwide.

The Georgetown University Center for Global Health Science and Security partnered with the Office of the D.C. Auditor to evaluate the data available to quantify the impacts of COVID-19 on mental health across the District of Columbia.

In the study released on April 23, researchers identified more than 50 datasets related to behavioral health care service needs, supply, and demand at the local, regional, and national levels. 

Experts also found a notable increase in mental health diagnoses during the COVID-19 pandemic in D.C. 

The researchers concluded that investments in behavioral health data systems could lay the foundation for early solid warning systems to identify crises and target responses across all levels of the behavioral system.

“Given the wide range of patient needs, care providers, and services offered, layered analysis and interventions are needed to understand ongoing and emergent needs related to behavioral health in the District,” the researchers determined.

“Accordingly, stakeholders involved in response need access to timely, publicly available data to inform these efforts.”

 Meanwhile, experts note that mental health challenges like eating disorders have also increased.

According to a recent JAMA report, “a common misconception is that eating disorders affect a specific type of person: the media’s portrayals are not always accurate.”

In the United States, the organization said eating disorders already affect 28.8 million people, and those aged 12 through 25 comprise 95% of cases. 

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) reported that eating disorders are severe mental and physical illnesses affecting “all genders, ages, races, religions, ethnicities, sexual orientations, body shapes, and weights.”

These disorders have the second-highest mortality rate of all mental health disorders, surpassed only by opioid

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